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Archive for the ‘Church’ Category

Birds, birds, birds

bird mosaic Delphi The mosaic in this unfortunately small composite photo is at the ancient site sacred to Apollo at Delphi. A few things are remarkable about it. First is that it is a quite beautiful and detailed depiction of birds. The second, based on my own assumption, is that most of the birds types depicted are still around. Partridges and waders, ducks and what look like domesticated fowl. I spot a magpie in there. Another aspect that I (Tom) find interesting is that the mosiac is the floor of an early Christian basilica, built at Delphi where we know all kinds of activities occurred including worship of Apollo and the famous divinations of the Pythia. Can we assume peaceful coexistence? In the late 300s Christian Emperor Theodosius ‘I’ encouraged the destruction of pagan temples throughout the Roman Empire and scholars suggest that the magnetism Delphi held in the ancient world was gone forever. Subsequent earthquakes and mud-slides covered the site until French archaeologists discovered the site beneath a village called Kastri and uncovered it in the late 1880s.

  • I’d like to know more.   [photo below enlarges]

    detail

    detail

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  • -3
    Professional tenor and Byzantine music teacher Stathis Karagiorgi will teach how to sing Byzantine church music. Classes are free and open to anyone. The lessons begin tonight (Tuesday) at 6:30 at Panagia Faneromeni.

    Byzantine music is the type of music you hear from the churches on Sundays and feast days.

    The music notation above will probably look more like this…
    -1

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    A holy relic

    fiat fiorino
    Nearly bumped into this relic outside the “Sotiris” “Metamorphosis” monastery. Now unregistered, it is parked with its port side to the south, hence the covering of tires for protection from the sun. The wheel well rocks to stabilize the covers is a nice touch. Fiat Fiorino 1050 (1980s?)

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    AgJohn1Jun15

    … up the steps to Agios Iannis tou Kastri. Appearing formidable from afar, the climb is actually easier than it looks. People of all ages can do it from the parking to the summit in under 10 minutes (usually). However the walk down is more challenging, possibly wreaking havoc on the knees and the equilibrium.

    The little church is a disappointment for some pilgrims because it is “much smaller than in the movie” as the interior becomes crowded with more than 8 people standing. It is still worth the trek as the autoway down from Glossa twists and turns unexpectedly and offers views of the Aegean to those who dare take their eyes from the road.

    Yesterday the scent of the plants and herbs at the base of the rock was, well, breathtakingly sweet.

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    episkopi31May15
    …whatever. The road out from “Episkopi” monastery towards the νταμάρη (damari = quarry) has finally been resurfaced. That’s the monastery in the photo. Built on the site of a temple honoring the goddess Artemis, it now contains a church dedicated to the Panayia. Pieces of ancient carved marble remain strewn about the courtyard.

    The new road surface allows a more comfortable ride at higher speeds but watch out for the 180º turn about 100 meters on. Oncoming traffic tends to borrow your lane.

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    It appears thay only one half of the sun will shine today

    It appears thay only one half of the sun will shine today


    Today is the feast day of Ag. Konstantinos and Eleni. If you have friends with those names you may find it difficult to contact them. Reason?
    Everybody else in the Greek world is trying to call to wish them Chronia Polla.

    Constantine the Great, Roman emperor, was converted to Christianity with the help of his mother Helen. Subsequently he declared Christianity the state religion of the Roman Empire. That’s why they became saints.

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    DSCN1031
    We spotted this conflagration a few mornings ago and were about to call “199” (but after the photo) when the fire went down and disappeared from the window. It turns out that a fire here is not an unusual happening but is the consummation of leftovers after exhumation. After the washing of the larger bones for placement in a box for the ossuary the remains are turned to ash. Then what?

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